Transitioning From Web Developer to Comic Book Author:

When Was The Gleneagles Agreement Signed

“The agreement was a victory for all Commonwealth countries, as they had all agreed to do their best… Breaking the apartheid system in sport,” said British Prime Minister James Callaghan, adding that each country would strive to “maintain and strengthen” the consensus negotiated at the summit. After the end of apartheid and the country`s first truly democratic election, when Nelson Mandela was elected president, South Africa returned to the Commonwealth in 1994. In the 1977 Gleneagles Agreement, Commonwealth Presidents and Prime Ministers, as part of their support for the international campaign against apartheid, agreed to end contact and competition between their athletes and sports organizations, teams or individuals in South Africa. The agreement was unanimously approved by the Commonwealth of Nations meeting in Gleneagles, Perthshire, Scotland. [1] In 1977, Muldoon joined the Gleneagles Agreement, a pact between Commonwealth leaders, to prevent sports contact with South Africa, which at the time had an apartheid policy – a separate development for its black and white citizens. In 1981, however, he refused to prevent a highly controversial tour of New Zealand for the Springbok rugby team in South Africa. This cartoon by Peter Bromhead deplores the resulting damage to New Zealand`s international reputation. The agreement limited South Africa`s ability to compete in international competitions involving sports such as rugby and cricket, which tended to dominate Commonwealth countries, and helped increase international pressure on the regime. The Gleneagles Agreement reaffirmed its commitment to combating racism, as contained in the Singapore Declaration on Commonwealth Principles (1971).

This commitment was reinforced by the declaration on racism and racist prejudice adopted by Commonwealth heads of state and government in Lusaka in 1979. The Commonwealth has been a relevant body to ban sport in South Africa, as some of the most popular sports among white South Africans are dominated by Commonwealth member states, such as cricket and the Rugby Union. [1] [2] Comments are verified prior to publication. Not all comments have been posted. Tell me more… Commonwealth countries, which include peoples of different races, colours, languages and beliefs, have long recognized prejudice and discrimination as a dangerous disease and a unmovable disease and are required to do everything in their power to promote human dignity everywhere. At their meeting in London, the Heads of State and Government reaffirmed that apartheid, in sport as in other areas, is an abomination and is directly contrary to the principles of the Commonwealth Declaration they made in Singapore on 22 January 1971. In view of these and other considerations, they have accepted as an urgent duty of each of their governments to vigorously fight the evil of apartheid, withholding all forms of assistance and taking all practical measures to ensure the contact or competition of their nationals with sports organizations, teams or athletes from South Africa or any other country where sport is organized on the basis of race to prevent and take any practical measures to prevent the trafficking of their nationals with sports organisations, teams or athletes from South Africa or any other country where the sport is organized on the basis of race. , colour or ethnic origin. In particular, the Heads of State and Government welcomed the unanimous conviction expressed at their meeting that, given their consultations and agreement, it is unlikely that there will be future important sporting contacts between Commonwealth countries or their nationals and South Africa, as long as south Africa pursues the abhorrent policy of apartheid. On this basis, and taking into account their commitments, they welcomed the Commonwealth Games in Edmonton and the continued strengthening of Commonwealth sport in general. Alexander Turnbull Library Reference: A-322-068 Alexander Turnbull Library Approval, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained

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